How to Get Feedback from Blog Readers: Tips, Examples and FAQs

Have you ever wondered how to get feedback from blog readers? You're not alone! Feedback is an important part of blogging because it allows you to improve your content for future posts. In this article, we'll go over the importance of feedback, different ways to get feedback from your readers, and what to do with that feedback once you have it. We'll also share some examples of how other bloggers use their comments and tips for getting more quality feedback in the future.


Why you need feedback


The first step in getting feedback from blog readers is to figure out why you need it. Often, bloggers will not think about this aspect of blogging and just jump into asking for feedback without a good reason. The only way that your readers are going to know what kind of topics or information they want covered on your site is if you tell them! It's important to remember that when someone visits your site, they can't see what content has been posted there before so they don't have any clue as to whether their input would be valuable or helpful for future posts unless you give them the chance.


Asking questions such as "What do you like best about my blog?" and "What features should I add/remove next time around?" help you to get started with the feedback process. However, it's important that you listen carefully and respond thoughtfully to their answers! Don't be dismissive of any comments or advice that your readers give you because they are just trying to help.


Communication is key in every relationship so if you want a good partnership between yourself and blog readers then take them seriously when they provide helpful criticism for future posts.


How do I ask my readers for feedback?


There are various ways that bloggers can go about asking their audience members for input on what content should be included in the next post, whether its via social media networks like Facebook, Twitter or Google+, by using an email list service such as Mailchimp, through online comment sections on your site or in your blog's sidebars, or by asking questions directly on your site.


Some examples of these questions include: "What do you think about my new design?" and "Which topic would interest you the most next week?"


While it may be easy to ask for feedback through social media networks like Facebook, Twitter or Google+ because there are already existing conversations happening between yourself and other users (and they're probably more inclined to want to help!), I find that getting comments from readers directly on my own site is much easier than having them go leave a comment somewhere else online. Plus this way I know exactly where their advice was given so if I choose not to use it then at least I can look back at what they said later on.


I find that email lists are also a great option for getting feedback from blog readers because it's easy to get in touch with the people who have signed up by using something like an opt-in form, which will then send out automated emails asking them what they would prefer to see on my site next week or their thoughts about my new design. If I'm wanting more than just one person's opinion and want the input of everyone in my list then I'll usually ask three questions: What do you think is most important in any post? How much time should we allocate towards it each day/week/month? Do we need anything extra (videos, images etc.) to go along with this topic?" By doing so, I can get a good sense of what the majority of my readers want to see and I can then use that information when creating blog posts in the future.


I personally like using sidebars on my site because they're small enough that most people don't even notice them, but if you ask your audience members for feedback there then it's likely that many will respond! It's also helpful because these types of questions are usually short so you'll get several different answers back quickly which means more variety and ideas for future content.


Last but not least is asking specific questions directly on your site through text or video form – this way you know exactly where their advice was given so whether or not you decide to take it into as well as having an existing conversation already going on between yourself and other users.


Asking questions such as "What do you like best about my blog?"


and "Which topic would interest you the most next week?" help you to get started with the feedback process. However, it's important that you listen carefully and respond thoughtfully to their answers! Don't be dismissive of any comments or advice that your readers give you because they are just trying to help.


Communication is key in every relationship so if you want a good partnership between yourself and blog readers then take them seriously when they provide helpful criticism for future posts.


How much time should I spend reading each answer? Should I read all responses from one person before moving onto others? It depends entirely on how much time you have and how many responses you're actually getting. If it's just a handful then go ahead and read all of them as quickly as possible, but if there are hundreds or thousands then try to slow down your reading speed so that you can take the time to properly digest each answer and decide whether or not it is something useful for future content!


As always I like to keep things organized by marking every response with either one (this is helpful information!) two (useful feedback) or three (good advice).


When responding back it's important that you don't dismiss anything anyone has said because everyone has their own unique way of thinking which means they may come up with different ideas than what we would do in certain situations.


That means that even if someone gives you feedback which doesn't match up with how your blog is run or what other readers are saying, it's still important to listen because they might have a different perspective on the situation! For example, some people may say "I really like this latest post about nutrition" while others say "the last food-related article wasn't too useful." Either way both opinions need to be taken into consideration and acted upon accordingly.


For instance, I could see where these two comments were coming from so depending on my mood either edit the older one (if necessary) or write another related piece of content for next week instead! The most important part is figuring out why certain things aren't working well by taking into account what everyone has to say and then applying it accordingly.


This is just a small example of how you can use feedback from blog readers to improve your content creation process so I hope these tips help!


If anyone else has any advice on this topic or anything related, please feel free to leave it in the comments below as well as where you think others might be able to find out more information about getting regular reader feedback for their blogs!


About Me: The easiest way is by using sidebars because those are typically much smaller than other areas such as headers which means people won't notice them unless they're looking through every part of your site (which most aren't!). You could also ask directly if someone would like some sort of contact form for feedback purposes but it's always good to have options.



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